NetSfere won a place on the £250m NHS SBS Patient/Citizen Communication & Engagement Solutions Framework through which all NHS organizations can access communication platforms

CHICAGO, Jan. 04, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — NetSfere, a global provider of next-generation secure and compliant messaging and mobility solutions, has been named an approved communication supplier on NHS Shared Business Service’s (NHS SBS) Patient/Citizen Communication & Engagement Solutions Framework, under which NHS organizations and the public sector in the UK can contract services.

Through the £250m framework designed to enhance interactions with patients and advance the digitization of the United Kingdom’s healthcare system, all NHS organizations have access to NetSfere’s portfolio of products.

The framework aims to provide a simple, effective, efficient, and compliant route to market for the supply of communication methods to engage with patients, citizens and the workforce across NHS organizations and wider public sector bodies.

“Helping healthcare organizations streamline communications in a secure and efficient method has been a primary focus of NetSfere,” said Franz Obermayer, NetSfere’s Vice President UK & Europe. “As part of the Patient/Citizen Communications & Engagement Solutions Framework, NetSfere’s platforms are available to support NHS organizations’ needs for digital tools on a massive scale as the healthcare system looks to improve clinical efficiency and safety to increase patient satisfaction and address concerns that arose from the pandemic.”

Providing NHS organizations multiple avenues to streamline internal and external communications, the NetSfere platform is the leading enterprise mobile messaging service that provides all preferred means of communication – text, video, and voice – all in one encrypted platform. With omnichannel and emergency alert capabilities, NetSfere’s portfolio offers the most holistic, secure, all-in-one communication solution on the market.

“The coronavirus pandemic has added to the complexity of patient appointments and waiting lists,” said Adam Nickerson, Senior Category Manager of Digital and IT at NHS Shared Business Services. “Our Patient/Citizen Communications & Engagement Solutions Framework is designed to respond to the need within the NHS for better pre- and post-appointment communications, to reduce the backlog of urgent appointments and improve the patient journey, pathway and care.”

Addressing the need for compliant and efficient internal communication methods, NetSfere Enterprise features solutions that empower employees with powerful, enterprise-class messaging technology, eliminating the need to use risky, consumer-grade messaging apps. Created with end-to-end encryption and full IT control, the platform is compliant with global regulations and provides enterprises with a private, highly secure, reliable centrally managed and controlled, cloud-based messaging service.

On the patient communication side, NetSfere Omnichannel enables digital customer engagement from a single platform with multi-channels to orchestrate the customer communication journey, including 1-way and 2-way SMS, MMS and RCS messaging, push notifications, voice, email, and social media messaging. The platform provides key benefits like intelligent routing and cost optimization, content management, number validation for increased open rates, full enterprise admin controls, rich analytics, and data archiving. The platform protects medical staff and patients with the highest level of security and meets all regulatory compliance standards including HIPAA, GDPR and PCI DSS.

NHS organizations can also implement NetSfere Lifeline through the framework. The solution allows enterprises to send high priority, critical messaging for targeted teams or an entire organization to disperse emergency information in an attention-grabbing manner. Messages can include text, images, or locations, ensuring that all essential information can be shared quickly in critical situations.

As one of the selected suppliers, NetSfere’s solutions were accepted across five lots: Digital (Online) Communication, Email, SMS, Workforce Communication, and All-in-One Solutions.
For more information on NetSfere’s portfolio of products, visit www.netsfere.com.

About NetSfere
NetSfere is a secure enterprise messaging service and platform from Infinite Convergence Solutions, Inc. NetSfere provides industry-leading security and message delivery capabilities, including global cloud-based service availability, device-to-device encryption, location-based features and administrative controls. The service is also offered in partnership with Deutsche Telekom GmbH, one of the world’s leading integrated telecommunications companies, and with NTT Ltd., a global information communications & technology service provider, to jointly offer NetSfere to its worldwide customers. The service leverages Infinite Convergence’s experience in delivering mobility solutions to tier 1 mobile operators globally and technology that supports more than 400 million subscribers and over a trillion messages on an annual basis. NetSfere is also compliant with global regulatory requirements, including GDPR, HIPAA, Sarbanes-Oxley, ISO 27001 and others. Infinite Convergence Solutions has offices in the United States, Germany, India and Singapore. For more information, visit www.netsfere.com.

About NHS Shared Business Services
NHS Shared Business Services (NHS SBS) was created in 2004 by the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) to deliver corporate services to the NHS. A unique joint venture with Sopra Steria, a European leader in digital services and software development, it makes life easier for NHS employees, patients and suppliers, and deliver value for money to the taxpayer.

Proud members of the NHS family, NHS SBS provides finance & accounting, procurement and workforce services to more than half the NHS in England. Sharing common values and unity of purpose with the rest of the NHS family, its solutions are underpinned by cutting-edge technologies and the teams’ expertise, in-depth understanding of the NHS, and commitment to service excellence.

Media Contact
Rachel Gunia
Uproar PR for NetSfere
312-878-4575 x246
rgunia@uproarpr.com

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