Beats competitors with mature solution, latest technology and solid signaling expertise

WAKEFIELD, Mass., Aug. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Xura, Inc. (NASDAQ:MESG), a leading provider of digital communications and security services, today announces that its Signaling Fraud Management solution has been chosen by one of the world’s largest mobile network operators, for real-time analysis and fully-active signaling filtering.  Through a thorough competitive tender (RFP) process, Xura’s solution was selected ahead of its closest competitors for its technical superiority, clearly diminishing the validity of one competitor’s claim to be “market leader”.

“Selection by a mobile operator of this pedigree is an excellent endorsement of Xura’s solid capabilities to protect the operation of our customers’ networks, and to secure the services delivered to subscribers,” said Glen Murray, Xura’s Managing Director and SVP for EMEA.

The decision in favor of Xura is understood to be based on Xura’s ability to demonstrate the power of its Signaling Fraud Management solution, in conjunction with the depth of experience the company has in signaling.  Xura built and operates its own SS7 and Diameter signaling stacks, which are deployed in mission-critical solutions for hundreds of operators serving more than half the world’s subscribers.

“Having access to our own signaling stacks has enabled us to develop highly flexible and fully-featured signaling security products,” commented Ilia Abramov, Product Director for Xura’s Security Solutions. “Power and flexibility continue to be an important differentiator, and Xura has a wealth of signaling and security experience gained from exposure to signaling in hundreds of networks. Our Security Management and Response Team can leverage the product elasticity to ensure Xura’s customers have a tailored solution with the advantages of faster reaction time to new signaling threats, and greater protection of revenue-generating network operation.”

To find out more about Xura’s network security products including Spam Shield and Signaling Fraud Management, please visit www.xura.com or email: contactxura@xura.com.

About Xura, Inc.

Xura, Inc (NASDAQ:MESG) offers a portfolio of digital services solutions that enable global communications across a variety of mobile devices and platforms. We help communication service providers and enterprises navigate and monetize the digital ecosystem to create innovative, new experiences through our cloud-based offerings. Our solutions touch more than three billion people through 350+ service providers and enterprises in 140+ countries.  You can find us at Xura.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release includes “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements include statements of plans and objectives for future operations, statements of future economic performance, and statements of assumptions relating thereto. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of terminology such as “may,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “believes,” “potential,” “projects,” “forecasts,” “intends,” or the negative thereof or other comparable terminology. By their very nature, forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other important factors that could cause actual results, performance and the timing of events to differ materially from those anticipated, expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements in this press release. These risks and uncertainties discussed above, as well as others, are discussed in greater detail in our filings with the SEC. The documents and reports we file with the SEC are available through us, or our website, www.Xura.com, or through the SEC’s Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system (EDGAR) at www.sec.gov.

Media Contact:
Maria Hudson
Xura
maria.hudson@xura.com
+44 7967813429

Investor Relations Contact:
Luke Todd
Xura
Luke.todd@Xura.com
+1-781-213-2131

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